Posted in Joy the Baker.
October 11, 2022

Here’s How To Make Restaurant-Quality Brussels Sprouts At Home


how to make brussels sprouts at home

I spent too many years not eating Brussels sprouts because for too many years before that, I was eating baaad Brussels sprouts.  Brussels sprouts are essentially tiny cabbages.  They’re nutrient dense and very farty – a vegetable to be respected.

There was a time maybe seven years ago when Brussels sprouts had their glow up.  We were collectively obsessed and collectively shocked by our obsession.  This was the time before we were turning cauliflower into both rice and steak. Listen, every hot veggie gets their time.  But Brussels sprouts, most notably restaurant Brussels sprouts had more of a chokehold on my food brain than I care to admit.  There was some wizardry that restaurant kitchens performed to get crispy, bright and aggressively salted sprouts.  Now I realize that wizardry was actually just a deep fryer and of course we love tiny cabbages if they’re fried tiny cabbages!

The offering today, since we’ve reached sweater weather, is how to cook Brussels sprouts that taste as good as deep fried restaurant sprouts without the deep fry or the restaurant.  We’re making the best home Brussels inspired by The Splendid Table.

ingredients for brussels sprouts on a cutting board

Here are the ingredients you’ll need to make the very best Brussels sprouts at home:

•  a pound of Brussels sprouts, edges trimmed and sliced in half.

•  4 tablespoons of olive oil

•  sea salt and fresh cracked black pepper

•  an acid like lemon juice, red wine vinegar, or balsamic vinegar.

•  parmesan cheese

•  fresh parsley

•  extras include: dijon mustard, and brown sugar mixed with your acid.

This recipe for how to cook Brussels sprouts is all about technique.  The cliffnotes: use a cold pan with a lid and lots of oil to steam and brown the sprouts all at once.

No need to roast or bake the sprouts in the oven. We’re keeping it simple.

First: Trim the stem ends of the sprouts and cut them in half.  The cut side will create more space for that glorious browning and it’s always nice to see how Mother Nature made a whole ass cabbage to tiny and cute. Admire all the inner layers because vegetables are actually so cool.  All the little outer leaves that fluff off once the end is trimmed? Save those we’ll cook those, too.

Second: Grab a skillet – a pretty big one with a lid that fits cozy.  Nonstick isn’t important and I haven’t tried this recipe in cast iron though I suspect it works just fine.  Pour oil into the cold pan.  It will feel like a lot of oil and you might be tempted to use less oil but don’t.  Trust me on this one, ok?  Add the halved Brussels sprouts to the pan with oil, cut side down in a single layer.  Sprinkle the little leafy bits on top.  Put the lid on the pan.

Third: Place the cold pan with oil, Brussels, and the lid over medium-high heat for 5-7 minutes.  Don’t lift the lid. Don’t shake the pan – just let it all go. This is where the magic happens.  The Brussels sprouts will create steam as they cook and that lid is helping them steam to tender all while the oil is heating and browning those little babies to golden.  After 5-7 minutes, remove the lid, shake the pan around and allow the Brussels to pan fry uncovered for another 5 minutes.  Test with a fork to ensure the inside is tender.

Fourth: Remove the pan from the heat and toss in salt, pepper, lemon juice and parsley. Be generous. Be very cheffy about it.

I’ll leave the recipe below so you can print it though it’s mostly just folding the technique into your dinner plans.  This dish is a great veggie side to a chicken dinner but I also eat them on their own over buttery rice.

Friends, let me know if this stovetop technique changed your life like it has mine.  Dramatic, yes – but sometimes the little things are the big things and I’m still not done celebrating the Brussels Sprout glow up.

Oh wait! If you’re down with the intensity of raw Brussels sprouts, try this Shaved Brussels Sprout Salad with pineapple poppy vinaigrette! I mean the fiber alone – we’re healthy and wealthy.

Print

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Description

The perfect crisp and tender Brussels sprouts. Perfect as a side dish with roasted chicken but also delicious on their own with buttery rice.



Trim the ends of the sprouts and cut them in half.  The cut side will create more space for that glorious browning and it’s always nice to see how Mother Nature made a whole ass cabbage to tiny and cute. Admire all the inner layers because vegetables are actually so cool.  All the little outside leaves that fluff off once the end is trimmed? Save those we’ll cook those, too.

Grab a skillet – a pretty big one that has a lid that fits cozy.  Nonstick isn’t important and I haven’t tried this recipe in cast iron though I suspect it works just fine.  Pour oil into the cold pan.  It will feel like a lot of oil and you might be tempted to use less oil but don’t.  Trust me on this one, ok?  Add the halved Brussels sprouts to the pan with oil, cut side down in a single layer.  Sprinkle the little leafy bits on top.  Put the lid on the pan.

Place the cold pan with oil, Brussels, and the lid over medium-high heat for 5-7 minutes.  Don’t lift the lid. Don’t shake the pan – just let it all go. This is where the magic happens.  The Brussels sprouts will create steam as they cook and that lid is helping them steam to tender all while the oil is heating and browning those little babies to golden.  After 5-7 minutes, remove the lid, shake the pan around and allow the Brussels to pan fry uncovered for another 5 minutes.  Test with a fork for doneness.

Remove the pan from the heat and toss in salt, pepper, lemon juice and parsley. Be generous. Be very cheffy about it. Optional extras: a spoonful of dijon mustard and brown sugar are glorious additions to the acid.


Joy the Baker October 11, 2022 at 07:30AM

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